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Archive for April 12th, 2015

“And forgive us our debts,

as we forgive our debtors.”

Mat 6.12

>> Notice the “AS” – “in the same way” <<

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“We count those things perfect which want nothing

for the end where unto they were instituted”

– Richard Hooker, quoted by Thomas Cook in New Testament Holiness

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Nearly every “Christian” cult has a hand reaching back into the OT (or worse).

They do NOT fully accept Christ.

– eab, 3/30/15

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The next tome tells of many kings

Shows Solomon knew a lot of things

Lists his good temple prayer

Says Queen Sheba was there

And Elijah a victory brings.

[Content – 1st Kings]

– eab,      4/12/05

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ON THIS DATE

Samuel Marinus Zwemer was born 4/12/1867, Vriesland, MI, 13th child of a full-blooded Dutch couple.  His father pastored the local Dutch Reformed Church & mother dedicated Samuel to God “as she laid him in his cradle.”  He graduated from Hope Academy & College (BA) & New Brunswick Seminary (BD 1890). 

Still at Hope he offered himself for work among the Muslims.  He & his classmate, James Cantine, moved to Basra on the Persian Gulf & later moved the mission to Cairo.  Arabia & Egypt were home for him from 1890-1929, first doing evangelism then writing/publishing.  He became known as “The Apostle to Islam.” Though he personally saw few Moslems converted he showed the need to reach them & inspired others.

It was while Zwemer was a part of the Church Missionary Society in Arabia (1890-1913) that he met Amy Elizabeth Wilkes.  He & this fellow missionary were married 5/18/1896. 1929-1937.  He was professor of the history of religion & Christian missions at Princeton Theological Seminary & later taught at the Biblical Seminary of New York & at Nyack Missionary Training Institute.  He died 4/2/1952.

He called Islam the “Calvinism of the Orient,” & saw their grasp of Monotheism as a great strength AND also a great deficiency; for without an “understanding of the Trinity, God was unknowable and impersonal.”

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