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Archive for the ‘poet American’ Category

ON THIS DATE 

Ray Willis Chamberlain was born 2/25/1902 at Charleston, Missouri, to Charles & Barbara (Griffith) Chamberlain.  He married Marianne Elizabeth Horine and they were blessed with several children.  In the 40’s – 50’s he and his family were Pilgrim Holiness missionaries to Jamaica. In the fall of 1987 Ray & Marianne started the Holiness Lecture Series at Wesley Biblical Seminary, Jackson, Mississippi: first speakers were Roy Appleby, Andy Miller, Keith Drury, & Richard S Taylor (the last of these was Best).

 

In 1982 Orlow Webb started an organization called TRY (Training Righteous Youth) Conference.  Bro Ray W Chamberlain came to one of the TRY Conference meetings (hosted 4 years at Friendsville, TN) and sang his chorus, “We’ve Got a Great Big Wonderful God.”  He died 1/2/98.

If the reader ever sees his small paper-back book, God Leads His Dear Children Along, it is definitely worth owning and reading a chapter a night in family altar. 

 

[ Personal note: The Lord has given us 2 sons & 2 daughters.  Both girls and their husbands & families) have spent years on 2 different continents as Gospel spreaders for Christ.  One or both would probably say that my view of missions influenced their lives.  And I trace my interest in missions to a man named Ray Chamberlain coming by the old Pilgrim Holiness Church in Bremen, when I was about 10. 🙂 ] 

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ON THIS DATE 

Esther L. Kerr was born 2/21/1909, in Arizona Territory.  Arizona was a Territory from 1863 until it became the 48th state, 2/14/1912, one week before Esther turned 3.  Her brother was an evangelist, Phil Kerr.  She married Howard Rusthoi, a minister – together they were called the “revival broadcasters.”  She (they?) attended/participated in a church called Angeles Temple in Los Angeles, California.  She died in Los Angeles, April 8, 1962.  She wrote “It will be worth it all.”

“It will be worth it all when we see Jesus, Life’s trials will seem so small when we see Christ;

One glimpse of His dear face all sorrow will erase, So bravely run the race till we see Christ.”

Personal note – this is the song our daughter Laura, my wife & I were singing to Mom (Ruth E. Bryan) as she slipped from this world to the next, 2/26/12.

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ON THIS DATE

William Elmo Mercer was born 2/15/1932 at Pollock, Louisiana.  He eHewrote his first song, “A Glimpse Of Jesus” at 14 which was later published by John T. Benson Publishing Company of Nashville, TN.  At 19 he wrote “Each Step I Take” which was recorded by 100s among whom was George Beverly Shea. Many years later in crusades in South Korea he discovered it was favorite there.  He played the piano at Park Avenue Baptist Church (Nashville) over 38 years, he and wife, Marcia, traveled in music evangelism visiting all 50 states across some 30 years.  Elmo wrote over 1,600 songs.  

Each step I take my Savior goes before me And with His loving hand He leads the way

And with each breath I whisper I adore Thee Oh what joy to walk with Him each day

Each step I take I know that He will guide me To higher ground He ever leads me on

Until some day the last step will be taken Each step I take just leads me closer home

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ON THIS DATE 

Francis Harold Rowley died 2/14/1952 at Boston.  He was born at Hilton, NY, 7/25/ 1854 son of a Dr. John & Mary (Smith) Rowley.  Francis graduated from Rochester Univ. & Rochester Theological Seminary & was ordained in 1878.  He pastored at Parker City & later Titusville (both PA), at North Adams, MA & at Oak Park, IL, returned to MA & pastored Fall River & later Boston. In later years he worked with hospitals: Robert Brigham Hospital (for incurables) & N.E. Baptist Hospital of Boston.

 A passport in 1890 described him as 35 years old, 5’ 5 ½” with a medium forehead, brown eyes, a straight nose, a mouth that was not large, a round chin, dark brown hair, an olive complexion, and a round face. It was while he pastor in North Adams, he wrote, “I Will Sing the Wondrous Story.” He was privileged in London once to come upon a Salvation Army band playing his song with no idea he was near.

I will sing the wondrous story Of the Christ Who died for me.

How He left His home in glory For the cross of Calvary.

Refrain

Yes, I’ll sing the wondrous story Of the Christ Who died for me,

Sing it with the saints in glory, Gathered by the crystal sea.

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ON THIS DATE

Rufus Henry McDaniel died, 2/13/1940. Born 1/29/1850, near Ripley, OH, he was schooled at Parker’s Academy, got preaching license at 19 & was ordained at 23. He appears to have married Margaret (1851-1928) prior to 1880 – they were blessed with three children. He pastored in Hamersville, Higginsport, Centerburg, Sugar Creek & Cincinnati (all OH) & retired to Dayton. He wrote some 100 songs.

A son, Herschel, died in 1913 & inspired “Since Jesus Came into My Heart”– there IS hope in trying times. Charles H Gabriel wrote a tune (McDaniel). It was introduced (in pamphlet) at a Billy Sunday campaign but was first published in Songs for Service by Homer A Rodeheaver in 1915. First known (to eab) recording was Roy Rogers/Dale Evens, 1953,RCA Victor. The Holy Spirit used the song in the conversion of a policeman named Fowler – his changed life is said to have led a 100 of his fellow policemen to Christ.

What a wonderful change in my life has been wrought Since Jesus came into my heart!

I have light in my soul for which long I had sought, Since Jesus came into my heart!

Refrain

Since Jesus came into my heart, Since Jesus came into my heart,

Floods of joy o’er my soul Like the sea billows roll, Since Jesus came into my heart.

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ON THIS DATE

Robert Sterling Arnold died 2/8/2003. He wrote “No Tears in Heaven.” He was born to Millard Arnold &  Rowena Victoria Lawrence 1/26/1905 at Coleman, TX.  He was a cousin to country-western singer Eddy Arnold.  Sterling began working in radio and singing with quartets while still a teenager and later sang with the Central Music Company quartet.  He managed the National Quartet as well as teaching piano and voice at Fort Worth.  Some of his songs were picked up by “professional artists.”  “No Tears in Heaven” for example, was recorded by Buck Owens, Skeeter Davis, Red Foley, and The Chuck Wagon Gang

“No tears in heaven, no sorrows given All will be glory in that land.

There’ll be no sadness, all will be gladness When we shall join that happy band.”

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ON THIS DATE

Samuel Wolcott, on this date, penned the words to “Christ for the World We Sing.”   He was born 7/2/1813 at South Windham, CT. After attending both Yale (AB 1833) & An­do­ver The­o­log­ic­al Sem­in­ary, he was briefly a mis­sion­ary in Syr­ia. He held pastorates in the east but also pastured in Chicago and Cleveland. While in Ohio he served as sec­re­tary of the Ohio Home Mis­sion­ary So­ci­e­ty and pastured the Ply­mouth Con­gre­ga­tion­al Church of Cleve­land.

He wrote, “It was on my way home from this serv­ice [a YMCA evangelistic service] in 1869, walk­ing alone through the streets, that I put to­ge­ther the four stan­zas of the hymn.” Some 200 hymns are at­trib­ut­ed to the Congregational clergyman Wolcott, who died 2/24/1886, back east in MA.       

Stanza 1 (of 4)

Christ for the world we sing, The world to Christ we bring, with loving zeal,

The poor and them that mourn, the faint and overborne, Sin sick and sorrow worn, whom Christ doth heal.

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