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Posts Tagged ‘1960’

O to be like Thee! blessèd Redeemer,
This is my constant longing and prayer;
Gladly I’ll forfeit all of earth’s treasures,
Jesus, Thy perfect likeness to wear.

O to be like Thee! O to be like Thee,
Blessèd Redeemer, pure as Thou art;
Come in Thy sweetness, come in Thy fullness;
Stamp Thine own image deep on my heart.

2. O to be like Thee! full of compassion,
Loving, forgiving, tender and kind,
Helping the helpless, cheering the fainting,
Seeking the wandering sinner to find.

3. O to be like Thee! lowly in spirit,
Holy and harmless, patient and brave;
Meekly enduring cruel reproaches,
Willing to suffer others to save.

4. O to be like Thee! Lord, I am coming
Now to receive anointing divine;
All that I am and have I am bringing,
Lord, from this moment all shall be Thine.

5. O to be like Thee! while I am pleading,
Pour out Thy Spirit, fill with Thy love;
Make me a temple meet for Thy dwelling,
Fit me for life and Heaven above.

Thomas Obadiah “T O” Chisholm died “this date” (2011 has no 2/29) 1960 at Ocean Grove, New Jer­sey.  He was a teacher at 16 and an associate newspaper editor (The Franklin Favorite) at 21.  He became a Christian in 1893 (under Henry Clay Morrison). At the persuasion of Morrison, Chisholm moved to Louisville, Kentucky to be the editor of the Pentecostal Herald.

In 1903 Chisholm was ordained a Methodist minister.  After a stint Winona Lake, Indiana, he took up selling insurance and moved to Vineland, New Jersey (1916).  T O Chisholm retired in 1953.  He was born 7/29/1866 at Franklin, Kentucky.

He is said to have published some 800 poems some we know as songs: “Christ Is Risen from the Dead,” “Great Is Thy Faithfulness,” “He Was Wounded for Our Transgressions,” “Living for Jesus,” “A New Creature,” “Only in Thee,” “The Prodigal Son,” “What Would We Do Without Jesus?”   to name a few.

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“It’s never right to do wrong – even to get a chance to do right.”

 

“Tarry in Jericho until your beards be grown”

 

“I’m going to write a book, Humility and How I Attained It.”

 

“Lie on, I like it.”

 

“There are three stages in a man’s life: Young, Middle age, and ‘You’re looking good.’”

 

– Not all may have been Herron’s originally, 

he is the one several of us associate with them.

 

Steve Douglas Herron, known to peers as “Steve,” to others as “S. D.” to a few as “Doctor,” but to many more as “Bro. Herron” died this date, 2/25/1994, at Charlotte, NC.

He was born 6/19/1917, at West Blockton, AL.  He received his Bachelors at Central Wesleyan College and his M.A. at Bob Jones University. His marriage to Dorothy Hammett was blessed with one daughter, Jane Herron Boxx, M.D.

Herron founded Hobe Sound Bible College in 1960, at Hobe Sound Florida.  He also founded WEAA (Wesleyan Education Association of America), the educational arm of IHC (Interchurch Holiness Convention) about 1972.  

His thoughtful and straight preaching blessed many a camp and convention platform in mid-century. He is gone but he is not forgotten – bless his memory.

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“…We have in the holiness Movement the practice of such things as mixed-bathing, wearing of all sorts of brief attire, movie viewing (at home and in theaters), public sports participation, etc. and no one is supposed to utter a protest…” [1]

“Trying to find where some holiness preachers stand on some issues it like trying to hold down an eel on a slippery rock.” [2]

“…Many are fooled by the liberal holiness preacher’s terminology…‘worldliness’…he in no real sense means…”  [3] 

Steve D. “S. D.” Herron died this date, 2/25/1994 at Charlotte, North Carolina.  He founded Hobe Sound Bible College in 1960.  Early HSBC board members included H. Robb French, C. Ponder Frederick, Mrs. Ella Zuch, Glenn Griffeth, and Andrew Whitney.

Herron was one of the greatest Christian educators of his time.


[1] S. D. Herron, “Modernism in the Holiness Movement,” The Pilgrim News (July/August 1986), 2. 

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ibid.

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…Faith…is the only door through which God comes into the human soul.

   Daniel Steele  The Gospel of the Comforter  (unknown printer/date; reprint, Rochester, NY: Schmul, 1960), 29.

 

…The exception proves the rule.                      

   Daniel Steele  The Gospel of the Comforter  (unknown printer/date; reprint, Rochester, NY: Schmul, 1960), 38.

 

David Livingston “‘I expressed that my object was to elevate him and his people to be Christians.’  He replied, ‘I do not wish to learn to read the Book, for I am afraid it might change my heart and make me content with one wife, like Sechele (a converted chief).  No, no, I want always to have five wives at least.’”

   Daniel Steele  The Gospel of the Comforter  (unknown printer/date; reprint, Rochester, NY: Schmul, 1960), 43.

 

…Character originates from free choice…

   Daniel Steele  The Gospel of the Comforter  (unknown printer/date; reprint, Rochester, NY: Schmul, 1960), 44.

 

The Spirit never coerces a free agent.

   Daniel Steele  The Gospel of the Comforter  (unknown printer/date; reprint, Rochester, NY: Schmul, 1960), 54.

 

…In the New Testament we never read expressly and unmistakably of sanctification as a gradual process.

   Daniel Steele  The Gospel of the Comforter  (unknown printer/date; reprint, Rochester, NY: Schmul, 1960), 100.

 

Daniel Steele was born this date, 10/5/1824, at Windham, NY.  He wrote the above and  Love Enthroned.

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I’ve known the joy that only a boy                    

Could feel – the swing of a vine. [1]

That’s entwined in a tree, for lads like me

To discover and enjoy. (Age?  Nine.)

 

I’ve felt the soft nose of a horse at repose,

And jumped o’er the hindquarters bare. [2]

And ridden baby cows or even some sows, [3]

When the farmer or owner wasn’t there.

 

I’ve enjoyed the snow fall; drifts fences tall,

And the resulting thrill – no bus! [4]

Sat with my feet on the oven door for heat,

That coal stove with ashes and fuss. [5]

 

I’ve ridden through a bridge o’er the blue [6]

That was covered and painted red.

Or walked or ran the bare-planked span;

That inside looked like a shed.

 

Ah, and, I’ve felt the pain of a leaving train,

When my lover was inside. [7]

And watched the last light till out of sight,

Then turned on my heel and cried.

 

I’ve stood still and wet on the date set,

Waiting for that girl in white.

Perspiring that season, for more than one reason,

On the year’s last, hot, June night. [8]

 

I’ve relished the smell of fall as it fell,

Time after burning-leaf time,

And drank cider sweet; it was hard to beat

Soft, amber, pure, sublime.

 

I’ve been privileged to hold the tiny mold

From which God makes a man.

And knew that his name and mine were the same;

Twenty-one years the span. [9]

 

I’ve known what it means to have little but beans

And then miss a bean with a dip.

To have cookies is nice – but because of the price

A cookie without a chocolate chip. [10]

 

I’ve walked the drifting miles; mid frowns & now smiles

Of students on Saturday hikes. [11]

Or joined them near nine, asphalt roads to entwine

On our trusty, but soon tiring bikes. [12]

 

I’ve been privileged to be three years near the sea.

O!  The smell of salt in the air!

See it calm or forlorn or white-cappy in storm,

Return with it still in my hair.

 

I’ve walked up with pain the inclined plain

Of a mountain’s bristly backbone.

Provisions in pack on my back,

Miles and hours from a phone. [13]

 

I’ve met and do know some of Christ’s best below

Saints, yes, saints above sod.

Who’ve worked in love, His power to prove,

Before they go home to God.

 

That’s not all I’ve had as a boy or a dad

There are, I’m sure, many more

In thirty one years, many joys, a few tears,

Since birth to seventy-four.       -eab,  2/10/74

 

[1] Off the edge of one of Uncle Wallace and Aunt Em’s fields on the farm off Stage Coach road (parallel with US 22.)

[2] At Mark Ricketts house, my school mate 1952-1957

[3] At Mark Rickett’s to which I’d walk (3-4 miles) to play.

[4] Drifts were from fencepost top to fencepost top in 1950.

[5] Stove also had reservoir for heating water on side.

[6] Was the first kid on and last one off so passed through covered bridge four times a day for most of five years (over 3500 passes).

[7] Union Terminal about 1960, Cincinnati, watching my sweet Martha head home for the summer. Took her there in a taxi.

[8] The church was not air conditioned on June 30, 1961.

[9] Andrew (also called “Charlie Brown”) It was not my idea to name him after me but since Martha wanted that, made him E. Andrew.

[10] Not complaining but times were slim back then.

[11] Hobe high school biology students and I would hike Jupiter Island from the end of the road to the island’s end (approximately 10 miles) specimens they found were theirs – fun belonged to all of us!

[12] Biology kids on bike hikes in Jonathan Dickinson Park. 

[13] Hiked the entire AT (Appalachian Trail) through the Smokies but this particular memory is when Carson, Dan, Andrew, and I ascending Thunderhead on a Christmas vacation trip. 


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