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Posts Tagged ‘born this date’

My hope is built on nothing less
Than Jesus’ blood and righteousness.
I dare not trust the sweetest frame,
But wholly trust in Jesus’ Name.

 

Refrain

On Christ the solid Rock I stand,
All other ground is sinking sand;
All other ground is sinking sand.

 

2. When darkness seems to hide His face,
I rest on His unchanging grace.
In every high and stormy gale,
My anchor holds within the veil.

 

3. His oath, His covenant, His blood,
Support me in the whelming flood.
When all around my soul gives way,
He then is all my Hope and Stay.

 

4. When He shall come with trumpet sound,
Oh may I then in Him be found.
Dressed in His righteousness alone,
Faultless to stand before the throne.

 

            “One morn­ing it came into my mind as I went to la­bour, to write an hymn on the ‘Gra­cious Ex­per­i­ence of a Christ­ian.’ As I went up Hol­born I had the chor­us,

                        ‘On Christ the solid Rock I stand,
                        All other ground is sinking sand.’

            “In the day I had four first vers­es com­plete, and wrote them off.  On the Sab­bath fol­low­ing I met bro­ther King as I came out of Lisle Street Meet­ing…who in­formed me that his wife was ve­ry ill, and asked me to call and see her. I had an ear­ly tea, and called af­ter­wards.  He said that it was his usu­al custom to sing a hymn, read a por­tion, and en­gage in pray­er, be­fore he went to meet­ing.  He looked for his hymn-book but could find it no­where.  I said, ‘I have some vers­es in my pock­et; if he liked, we would sing them.’ We did, and his wife en­joyed them so much, that af­ter ser­vice he asked me, as a fa­vour, to leave a co­py of them for his wife.  I went home, and by the fire­side com­posed the last two vers­es, wrote the whole off, and took them to sis­ter King…As these vers­es so met the dy­ing wo­man’s case, my at­ten­tion to them was the more ar­rest­ed, and I had a thou­sand print­ed for dis­tr­ibu­tion.  I sent one to the Spir­it­u­al Mag­a­zine, with­out my ini­tials, which ap­peared some time af­ter this. Bro­ther Rees, of Crown Street, So­ho, brought out an edi­tion of hymns [1836], and this hymn was in it.  Da­vid Den­ham in­tro­duced it [1837] with Rees’ name, and others af­ter…Your in­sert­ing this brief out­line may in fu­ture shield me from the charge of stealth, and be a vin­di­ca­tion of truth­ful­ness in my con­nect­ion with the Church of God.”

Edward Mote
Let­ter to the Gos­pel Her­ald

 

The above is reported to be his words about this song.

 

Edward Mote was born this date, 1/21/1797 at London.  He was a cabinet maker who became a minister.  During his last 22 years he penned some 100 songs.  It is thought that Mote FIRST used the term “Gospel Songs.” 

He died11/13/1874at Hor­sham,Sus­sex,Eng­land.

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God Calling Yet;  Shall I Not Hear?

 

God calling yet; shall I not hear?
Earth’s pleasures shall I still hold dear?
Shall life’s swift passing years all fly,
And still my soul in slumber lie?

God calling yet; shall I not rise?
Can I His loving voice despise,
And basely His kind care repay?
He calls me still—can I delay?

God calling yet, and shall He knock,
And I my heart the closer lock?
He still is waiting to receive,
And shall I dare His Spirit grieve?

Ah, yield Him all; in Him confide;
Where but with Him doth peace abide?
Break loose, let earthly bonds be riven,
And let the spirit rise to heaven.

God calling yet; and shall I give
No heed, but still in bondage live?
I wait, but He does not forsake;
He calls me still—my heart, awake!

God calling yet; I cannot stay;
My heart I yield without delay;
Vain world, farewell! from thee I part;
The voice of God hath reached my heart.

Gerhard Tersteegen [1] was born this date11/25/1697 at Meurs (maybe seenMors orMoers), Rhenish (maybe seenWestphalia or Nie­der­rhein),Prussia.  He was converted to Christ at age sixteen.  About 1724 he began doing religious teaching supported by gifts from friends. His ministry included the physical and spiritual needs, and the preparing of foods and simple medicines for those less blessed. After 1728, Tersteegen was an itin­er­ant minister in the Pro­test­ant “spir­i­tu­al awak­en­ing move­ment” in Niederrhein.  He is known to have translated some French Quietist works.  And he left behind a hymn, “God Calling Yet; Shall I Not Hear?”


[1] It is claimed that his real name was Dutch “Gerrit ter Steegen”

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Wonderful grace of Jesus,
Greater than all my sin;
How shall my tongue describe it,
Where shall its praise begin?
Taking away my burden,
Setting my spirit free;
For the wonderful grace of Jesus reaches me.

Refrain Wonderful the matchless grace of Jesus,
Deeper than the mighty rolling sea;
Wonderful grace, all sufficient for me, for even me.
Broader than the scope of my transgressions,
Greater far than all my sin and shame,
O magnify the precious Name of Jesus.
Praise His Name!

2. Wonderful grace of Jesus,
Reaching to all the lost,
By it I have been pardoned,
Saved to the uttermost,
Chains have been torn asunder,
Giving me liberty;
For the wonderful grace of Jesus reaches me.

3. Wonderful grace of Jesus,
Reaching the most defiled,
By its transforming power,
Making him God’s dear child,
Purchasing peace and heaven,
For all eternity;
And the wonderful grace of Jesus reaches me.

Haldor Lillenas was born this date,11/19/1885, at Island of Stord, Norway.  His Lutheran family moved to the US and after a stay in South Dakota (Colton, a few miles NW of Sioux Falls) settled  in Oregon.

 

Haldor was converted to personal faith in Jesus Christ at age 21 under the influence of the  Penial Mission in Portland.  He almost immediately felt a call to minister God’s Holy Word becoming a Nazarene as was his wife, Bertha Mae Wilson, also a song writer.

 

God gave Lillenas some 4,000 Gospel texts plus hundreds of hymn tunes, including the above.  In 1924 he founded Lillenas Music Company (bought by the Nazarenes in 1930) and worked there until he retired in 1950.  He passed away at Aspen, CO, 8/18/1959.

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1. Fairest of ten thousand is Jesus Christ, my Savior,
The Lily of the Valley, The Bright and Morning Star.
He is all my glory, and in this heart of mine
Forevermore I’m singing a song of love divine.

Refrain – ‘Tis the song of the soul set free,
            And its melody is ringing.
            ‘Tis the song of the soul set free;
            Joy and peace to me it’s bringing.
            ‘Tis the song of the soul set free;
            And my heart is ever singing,
            Hallelujah! Hallelujah! The song of the soul set free!

2. Once my heart was burdened, but now I am forgiven,
And with a song of gladness, I’m on my way to heav’n.
Christ is my Redeemer; my Song of Songs is He.
My Savior, Lord, and Master–to Him my praise shall be.

3. When He came to save me, He set the joybells ringing,
And now I’m ever singing, For Christ has ransomed me.
Once I lived in darkenss; the light I could not see.
But now I sing His praises, for He was set me free.

4. Angels cannot sing it–this song of joy and freedom,
For mortals only know it, the ransomed and the free.
Slaves were they in bondage and deepest misery;
But now they sing triumphant their songs of liberty.

Oswald J. Smith was born this date,11/8/1889, in Odessa, Ontario, Canada.  His dad was a telegraph operator for the Canadian Pacific Railway and Oswald was born in his parent’s home in Odessa.  He was converted to Christ (age 16) at a Torrey-Alexander campaign in Toronto(1/28/1906).  Smith (1934) formed the missionary-minded People’s Church of Toronto which funneled millions of dollars into missionary work.  Smith’s books (35 in number) have been translated into 70(+) languages, his preaching took him to 60(+) countries and he penned 1,200(+) songs including the above.  Oswald J. Smith died1/25/1986.

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When my eyes behold the stars
This heart of mine is filled with wonder,
My poor mind cannot grasp their array
But the hand that spilled them there,
All across the wide heaven
Had a plan when He placed them that way.

Known only to Him
Are the great hidden secrets.
I’ll fear not the darkness when my flame shall dim.
I know not what the future holds,
But I know who holds the future.
It’s a secret known only to Him.

In this world of fear and doubt
On my knees I ask the question,
Why a lonely heavy cross I must bear?
Then He tells me in my prayer,
It’s because I am trust worthy,
He gives me strength far more than my share.

Stuart Hamblen was born this date 10/20/1908 in Kellyville, Texas to a father who was a Methodist minister.  Western song enthusiasts may remember Hamblen for his several cowboy songs: “Texas Plains,” “My Mary,” “Golden River,” “Walkin’ My Fortune,” and “Ridin’ Old Paint.” But more of us remember him for his greatest song classic “It Is No Secret” (It is said that the original manuscript of this is buried in the cornerstone of one of the Copyright Buildings of the Library of Congress in Washington,D.C., and which has been translated into over 50 languages.)

 

In 1949, he gave up radio and film and publicly announced he was devoting his life to Christ.  Some other Christian songs are “Teach Me, Lord, To Wait,” “Until Then,” “Open Up Your Heart (and Let the Sunshine In),” “How Big Is God,” “His Hands,” “Beyond the Sunset,” and the above song.

 

He was married to his wife, Suzy, for 55(+) years living with her on their horse ranch in Canyon Country,California.  Stuart Hamblen died onMarch 8, 1989.

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In sorrow I wandered, my spirit oppressed,
But now I am happy—securely I rest;
From morning till evening glad carols I sing,
And this is the reason—I walk with the King.

 

Refrain

I walk with the King, hallelujah!
I walk with the King, praise His Name!
No longer I roam, my soul faces home,
I walk and I talk with the King.

 

2. For years in the fetters of sin I was bound,
The world could not help me—no comfort I found;
But now like the birds and the sunbeams of spring,
I’m free and rejoicing—I walk with the King.

 

3. O soul near despair in the lowlands of strife,
Look up and let Jesus come into your life;
The joy of salvation to you He would bring—
Come into the sunlight and walk with the King.

                                                – words by James Rowe, cir­ca 1913.

                                                – music B. D. Ackley

 

Bentley DeForest Ackley was born this date, 9/27/1872at Spring Hill, Pennsylvania.  As a youth he was able to play the me­lo­de­on, pi­ano, cor­o­net, clar­i­net and pic­co­lo.  He became a noted Christian musician, after escaping the pull of alcohol, joined the Billy Sun­day-Homer Rodeheaver team, and wrote some hymns.  He is primarily remembered as com­pos­er – having written over 3,000 Gos­pel tunes.  Bentley Ackley died9/3/1958, at Winona Lake, Indiana.

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Creation’s Lord, we give Thee thanks
That this Thy world is incomplete;
That battle calls our marshaled ranks;
That work awaits our hands and feet.

That Thou hast not yet finished man;
That we are in the making still,
As friends who share the Maker’s plan
As sons who know the Father’s will.

Beyond the present sin and shame,
Wrong’s bitter, cruel, scorching blight,
We see the beckoning vision flame,
The blessèd kingdom of the right.

What though the kingdom long delay,
And still with haughty foes must cope?
It gives us that for which to pray,
A field for toil and faith and hope.

Since what we choose is what we are,
And what we love we yet shall be,
The goal may ever shine afar—
The will to win it makes us free.

 

William De Witt Hyde was born this date, 9/23/1858, at Win­chen­don, Mass­a­chu­setts. He grew up with rel­a­tives (after his parent’s demise) in Keene, New Hamp­shire. He was ed­u­cat­ed at Phil­lips Acad­e­my in Ex­e­ter, Har­vard (ba­che­lor’s de­gree), Union The­o­lo­gic­al Sem­in­ary, and An­do­ver The­o­lo­gic­al Sem­in­ary.

 

He was a Congrega­tional pas­tor in Pat­er­son, New Jer­sey (1883-85).  From 1885 to 1917 he was pre­si­dent of Bow­doin Coll­ege (founded 1794).  His works in­clude: Practical Eth­ics, 1892, Practical Ideal­ism, 1897, God’s Ed­u­ca­tion of Man, 1899. Wrote “Crea­tion’s Lord, We Give Thee Thanks.”  Hyde died 6/29/1917, at Bruns­wick, Maine.

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