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Posts Tagged ‘England’

Onward, Christian soldiers, marching as to war,
With the cross of Jesus going on before.
Christ, the royal Master, leads against the foe;
Forward into battle see His banners go!

 

Refrain

Onward, Christian soldiers, marching as to war,
With the cross of Jesus going on before.

 

2. At the sign of triumph Satan’s host doth flee;
On then, Christian soldiers, on to victory!
Hell’s foundations quiver at the shout of praise;
Brothers lift your voices, loud your anthems raise.

 

3. Like a mighty army moves the churchof God;
Brothers, we are treading where the saints have trod.
We are not divided, all one body we,
One in hope and doctrine, one in charity.

 

4. What the saints established that I hold for true.
What the saints believèd, that I believe too.
Long as earth endureth, men the faith will hold,
Kingdoms, nations, empires, in destruction rolled.

 

5. Crowns and thrones may perish, kingdoms rise and wane,
But the church of Jesus constant will remain.
Gates of hell can never gainst that church prevail;
We have Christ’s own promise, and that cannot fail.

 

6. Onward then, ye people, join our happy throng,
Blend with ours your voices in the triumph song.
Glory, laud and honor unto Christ the King,
This through countless ages men and angels sing.

 

Sabine (Sā’ben) Baring-Gould (bā’ring  goold’) was born this date, 1/28/1834, Exeter, England.  After attending schools in Germanyand France, he entered Clare College (Cambridge).  He is said to have learned six languages and hold an interest in archaeology and in architect.  He wrote 100 books (30 of those  novels) and a 16-volume Lives of the Saints.  These were in addition to pastoring.  He died1/2/1924, inEngland.

 He wrote “Now the Day Is Over” and “Onward, Christian Soldiers.”

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“Christ is the only right Heir of the Crown of England”

 

His last words were “welcome joy!”

 

John Eliot a Puritanmissionary” to the American Indians on this date,8/22/1670, founded a church for Indians atMartha’s Vineyard,Massachusetts, and became known as “the Indian apostle.”

 

Earlier he had published The Christian Commonwealth: or, The Civil Policy Of The Rising Kingdom of Jesus Christ.   This was the first book on politics penned by an American.  It also became the first book an American government had banned.

 

Eliot was born in 1604 at Widford, Hertfordshire, England, attended Jesus College, Cambridge, became assistant to Thomas Hooker at a school in Little Baddow, Essex.  Eliot emigrated to Boston, Massachusetts, arriving 11/3/1631.  He died 5/21/1690.

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Take time to be holy, speak oft with thy Lord;
Abide in Him always, and feed on His Word.
Make friends of God’s children, help those who are weak,
Forgetting in nothing His blessing to seek.

Take time to be holy, the world rushes on;
Spend much time in secret, with Jesus alone.
By looking to Jesus, like Him thou shalt be;
Thy friends in thy conduct His likeness shall see.

Take time to be holy, let Him be thy Guide;
And run not before Him, whatever betide.
In joy or in sorrow, still follow the Lord,
And, looking to Jesus, still trust in His Word.

Take time to be holy, be calm in thy soul,
Each thought and each motive beneath His control.
Thus led by His Spirit to fountains of love,
Thou soon shalt be fitted for service above.

William D (Dunn) Longstaff was born this date, 11/26/1822 at Sunderland, Durham, England.  He was a philanthropist and friends with the founder of the Salvation Army, William Booth, with Dwight L Moody, and Ira D Sankey. Longstaff is remembered now for his hymn, “Take Time to Be Holy” but wrote a number of other hymns which appeared in the Salvation Army’s paper, The War Cry, in the 1880’s.  He died 4/2/1894 at Cambridge Terrace, Sunderland, Durham, England.

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O for a closer walk with God,
A calm and heavenly frame,
A light to shine upon the road
That leads me to the Lamb!

Where is the blessedness I knew,
When first I saw the Lord?
Where is the soul refreshing view
Of Jesus and His Word?

What peaceful hours I once enjoyed!
How sweet their memory still!
But they have left an aching void
The world can never fill.

Return, O holy Dove, return,
Sweet messenger of rest!
I hate the sins that made Thee mourn
And drove Thee from my breast.

The dearest idol I have known,
Whate’er that idol be
Help me to tear it from Thy throne,
And worship only Thee.

So shall my walk be close with God,
Calm and serene my frame;
So purer light shall mark the road
That leads me to the Lamb.

William Cowper died this date, 4/25/1800, at East Dereham, Norfolk, England. Cowper (pronounced “koo’ pur”) trained to be a lawyer but did not become one.  He is credited with over sixty hymns/gospel songs among which are “God Moves in a Mysterious Way” and “There Is a Fountain Filled with Blood.”

In spite of long-standing depression Cowper left not only the above (a spiritual literary legacy) he also wrote “The Negro’s Complaint” an anti-slavery work, and “The Task” – a work some 5,000 lines in length.  He was back-fence neighbors with John Newton, the author of famous “Amazing Grace.”  Cowper was born 11//15/1731, at Great Berk­hamp­stead, Hert­ford­shire, Eng­land.

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The more discordant, therefore, and incredible, the divine mystery is, the more honour is shown to God in believing it, and the nobler is the victory of faith.

There are two books laid before us to study, to prevent our falling into error; first, the volume of the Scriptures, which reveal the will of God; then the volume of the Creatures, which express His power.

The die is cast, the book is written, to be read either now or by posterity — I care not which; it may wait a century for a reader, as God has waited six thousand years for an observer. (Bacon, Novum Organum)

The above quotes are attributed to Sir Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon died this date 4/9/1626, in Highgate, a village near London.  He wrote many Essayes – “Of Studies” is an example.  Bacon was born 1/22/1561, in London, England.

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“Imprisonment is painful, but liberty, on ill conditions, is worse. The prison stinks, yet not so much as the sweet houses where the fear of God is wanting. I must be alone and solitary; it is better so to be, and have God with me, than to be in bad company. The loss of goods is great, but the loss of grace and the favor of God is greater. I cannot tell how to answer before great men, and learned men; yet is it better to do that, than to stand naked before God’s tribunal. I shall die by the hands of cruel men; but he is blessed who loseth his life, and findeth life eternal. There is neither felicity nor adversity in the world that is great, if it be weighed with the joys and pains of the world to come.”

                                                – Reported to be from a letter Hooper penned in prison.

John Hooper was martyred this date, 2/9/1555.  Some time after receiving his Bachelor of Arts from Cambridge he was converted to Christ by the writings of the German reformers.  At one point he felt obliged to flee to France and was briefly associate Huguenots. Later he was associated with Bullinger (Zwingli’s successor).  He returned to England and under Edward VI, was made Bishop of Gloucester.

In the providence of God Edward died.  He was followed by Queen Mary and she as a Roman Catholic required Hooper’s death.  Thus the “Father of the Puritans” was burned at the stake in the 60th year of his life. He was born c. 1495, at Somersetshire, England.

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The lump of clay, from the moment it comes under the transforming hand of the potter, is, during each day and each hour of the process, just what the potter wants it to be at that hour or on that day, and therefore pleases him. But it is very far from being matured into the vessel he intends in the future to make it.

            – Hannah Whitall Smith, The Christian’s Secret of a Happy Life (Westwood, NJ:                                Fleming Revell Co., 1952), 33.

Hannah Whitall Smith was born this date, 2/7/1832, at Philadelphia, PA.  She was a daughter of well-to-do Quaker parents.  After she married Robert Piersall Smith they converted to the group called Plymouth Brethren.  They were said to have a “new experience” (1867) and began a speaking tour of the United States and Europe. Their “Higher Christian Life” meetings in England were popular.  In 1875 she published, The Christian’s Secret of a Happy Life a book which has been printed in several languages.

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