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Posts Tagged ‘England’

January 30

“When thou hearest the sound of a going in the tops of the mulberry trees, then thou shalt bestir thyself.”—2 Samuel 5:24.

THE members of Christ’s Church should be very prayerful, always seeking the unction of the Holy One to rest upon their hearts, that the kingdom of Christ may come, and that His “will be done on earth, even as it is in heaven;” but there are times when God seems especially to favour Zion, such seasons ought to be to them like “the sound of a going in the tops of the mulberry trees.” We ought then to be doubly prayerful, doubly earnest, wrestling more at the throne than we have been wont to do. Action should then be prompt and vigorous. The tide is flowing—now let us pull manfully for the shore. O for Pentecostal outpourings and Pentecostal labours. Christian, in yourself there are times “when thou hearest the sound of a going in the tops of the mulberry trees.” You have a peculiar power in prayer; the Spirit of God gives you joy and gladness; the Scripture is open to you; the promises are applied; you walk in the light of God’s countenance; you have peculiar freedom and liberty in devotion, and more closeness of communion with Christ than was your wont. Now, at such joyous periods when you hear the “sound of a going in the tops of the mulberry trees,” is the time to bestir yourself; now is the time to get rid of any evil habit, while God the Spirit helpeth your infirmities. Spread your sail; but remember what you sometimes sing—

“I can only spread the sail;
Thou! Thou! must breathe the auspicious gale.”
Only be sure you have the sail up. Do not miss the gale for want of preparation for it. Seek help of God, that you may be more earnest in duty when made more strong in faith; that you may be more constant in prayer when you have more liberty at the throne; that you may be more holy in your conversation whilst you live more closely with Christ.

                                                                – From an internet version of Spurgeon’s Daily Meditations

Charles Haddon Spurgeon died 1/31/1892, at Mendon, France.  He pastored the famous Metropolitan Tabernacle, and edited “Sword and Trowel,” in addition to publishing 40 some miscellaneous volumes.  He was born 6/19/1834, Kelvedon, Essex, England.

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George Fox died this date, 1/13/1691, at London England.  As a boy/young man he associated with some Puritans and some Anabaptist.  These associations may well have lead Fox (at about 23) to leave the Church of England (Anglican Church) and become a wandering minister.

Fox and the Society of Friends (“Quakers”) which he founded in his mid-thirties, stressed the Holy Spirit’s dwelling in the human heart and each individual’s direct communion with God.  He married Margaret Fell (a widow) in 1669.  George Fox was born 7/?/1624, at Fenny Drayton, Leicestershire, England.

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“All Hail the Power of Jesus Name”

All hail the power of Jesus’ Name! Let angels prostrate fall;
Bring forth the royal diadem, and crown Him Lord of all.
Bring forth the royal diadem, and crown Him Lord of all.

Let highborn seraphs tune the lyre, and as they tune it, fall
Before His face Who tunes their choir, and crown Him Lord of all.
Before His face Who tunes their choir, and crown Him Lord of all.

Crown Him, ye morning stars of light, who fixed this floating ball;
Now hail the strength of Israel’s might, and crown Him Lord of all.
Now hail the strength of Israel’s might, and crown Him Lord of all.

Crown Him, ye martyrs of your God, who from His altar call;
Extol the Stem of Jesse’s Rod, and crown Him Lord of all.
Extol the Stem of Jesse’s Rod, and crown Him Lord of all.

Ye seed of Israel’s chosen race, ye ransomed from the fall,
Hail Him Who saves you by His grace, and crown Him Lord of all.
Hail Him Who saves you by His grace, and crown Him Lord of all.

Hail Him, ye heirs of David’s line, whom David Lord did call,
The God incarnate, Man divine, and crown Him Lord of all,
The God incarnate, Man divine, and crown Him Lord of all.

Sinners, whose love can ne’er forget the wormwood and the gall,
Go spread your trophies at His feet, and crown Him Lord of all.
Go spread your trophies at His feet, and crown Him Lord of all.

Let every tribe and every tongue before Him prostrate fall
And shout in universal song the crownèd Lord of all.
And shout in universal song the crownèd Lord of all.

Edward Perronet died this date, 1/2/1792, at Canterbury, Kent, England.  He was a son of an Anglican minister who was descended from good stock, the French Huguenots.

Perronet was a co-worker of John and Charles Wesley.  John Wesley tried to get Edward to preach, but he (perhaps in awe of Wesley) always wanted Wesley to preach instead. John Wesley was a determined man (could not have done what he did without being) and one day, in the middle of a meeting simply said, “Brother Perronet will now speak.”

Perronet stood up before the crowd and announced, “I will now deliver the greatest sermon ever preached on earth.”  (What do you think Wesley thought then?)  Perronet proceeded to read the Sermon on the Mount.  When he finished reading it he sat down.

It has been said that Perronet spent much of his life attacking abuses within the Church of England.  Be that as it may, today he is remembered as author of the hymn of praise, “All Hail the Power of Jesus’ Name,” the first stanza of which appeared anonymously in The Gospel Magazine, November 1779.

Edward Perronet was born in Sundridge, Kent, England, 1726.

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Gentle Mary laid her Child lowly in a manger;
There He lay, the undefiled, to the world a Stranger:
Such a Babe in such a place, can He be the Savior?
Ask the saved of all the race who have found His favor.

Angels sang about His birth; wise men sought and found Him;
Heaven’s star shone brightly forth, glory all around Him:
Shepherds saw the wondrous sight, heard the angels singing;
All the plains were lit that night, all the hills were ringing.

Gentle Mary laid her Child lowly in a manger;
He is still the undefiled, but no more a stranger:
Son of God, of humble birth, beautiful the story;
Praise His Name in all the earth, hail the King of glory!

Joseph Simpson Cook was born this date, 12/4/1859, at Durham County, England.  He was a Methodist who emigrated as a youth to Canada.  Cook received his education at Wesleyan College, McGill University, in Montreal.  He later served in the United Church of Canada.  He penned “Gentle Mary Laid Her Child” in 1919.  He died 5/27/1933, at Toronto, Canada.

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Watchman, tell us of the night,
What its signs of promise are.
Traveler, o’er yon mountain’s height,
See that glory beaming star.
Watchman, does its beauteous ray
Aught of joy or hope foretell?
Traveler, yes—it brings the day,
Promised day of Israel.

Watchman, tell us of the night;
Higher yet that star ascends.
Traveler, blessedness and light,
Peace and truth its course portends.
Watchman, will its beams alone
Gild the spot that gave them birth?
Traveler, ages are its own;
See, it bursts o’er all the earth.

Watchman, tell us of the night,
For the morning seems to dawn.
Traveler, darkness takes its flight,
Doubt and terror are withdrawn.
Watchman, let thy wanderings cease;
Hie thee to thy quiet home.
Traveler, lo! the Prince of Peace,
Lo! the Son of God is come!

John Bowring [Sir] died this date, 11/23/1872, at Devon, England.  His trade/ manufacture was in woolen goods.  It was so extensive that it increased his natural abilities in languages.  One report has him flu­ent in over twenty (20) lan­guages and speaking eighty (80) more.  Another report would place his speaking skills as high as a hundred (100) languages with a limited knowledge of up to two hundred (200).  In either case he had a phenomenal God–given strength and seems could carry on business in following named tongues: Boheman, Danish, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish. 

He served twice in Parliament, held several high government positions to foreign countries including being the governor of Hong Kong, and was knight by Queen Victoria.  In addition to all the worldly fame he had a deep interest in God as the above hymn shows and as his additional twenty (20) some others show.  His more famous one is “In the Cross of Christ I Glory” – see 10/17/2009 of this blog.

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Jesus, I my cross have taken, all to leave and follow Thee.
Destitute, despised, forsaken, Thou from hence my all shall be.
Perish every fond ambition, all I’ve sought or hoped or known.
Yet how rich is my condition! God and Heaven are still mine own.

Let the world despise and leave me, they have left my Savior, too.
Human hearts and looks deceive me; Thou art not, like them, untrue.
And while Thou shalt smile upon me, God of wisdom, love and might,
Foes may hate and friends disown me, show Thy face and all is bright.

Go, then, earthly fame and treasure! Come, disaster, scorn and pain!
In Thy service, pain is pleasure; with Thy favor, loss is gain.
I have called Thee, “Abba, Father”; I have set my heart on Thee:
Storms may howl, and clouds may gather, all must work for good to me.

Man may trouble and distress me, ’twill but drive me to Thy breast.
Life with trials hard may press me; heaven will bring me sweeter rest.
Oh, ’tis not in grief to harm me while Thy love is left to me;
Oh, ’twere not in joy to charm me, were that joy unmixed with Thee.

Take, my soul, thy full salvation; rise o’er sin, and fear, and care;
Joy to find in every station something still to do or bear:
Think what Spirit dwells within thee; what a Father’s smile is thine;
What a Savior died to win thee, child of heaven, shouldst thou repine?

Haste then on from grace to glory, armed by faith, and winged by prayer,
Heaven’s eternal day’s before thee, God’s own hand shall guide thee there.
Soon shall close thy earthly mission, swift shall pass thy pilgrim days;
Hope soon change to glad fruition, faith to sight, and prayer to praise.

Henry Francis Lyte was buried this date, 11/20/1847, Nice, France.  Though orphaned he was able to attended Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, specializing in English poetry.  Lyte married Anne Maxwell, 1818, at Bath, daughter of William Maxwell a minister of Monaghan. (Their very happy marriage produced at least one child, a daughter.)  From Trinity College he received his MA in 1820.

Lyte did not have a strong body and in later years suffered from asthma and consumption. His last pastorate (twenty-three years) was a poor parish, pastoring the fishermen and families in Lower Brixham, England.  (It was here he penned “Jesus, I My Cross Have Taken.”  Near the end of life (his health in worse condition) Lyte preached his last sermon and also wrote “Abide with Me, Fast Falls the Eventide.”

It was for his health sake that he had started to Italy but expired making it no farther than France. Lyte was born 6/1/1793, at Ed­nam, Scot­land.

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If obliged to differ…do I with all possible candor, and an unprejudiced desire to find and ascertain truth, with an entire indifference to the side on which truth is found.

                – William Pitt, “General Advice to Youthful Student,” in A Compendium of English Literature, ed.                    Charles D. Cleveland (Philadelphia: E.C.& J.Biddle, 1851), 642.

If you are not right towards God, you can never be so towards man.

                – William Pitt, “General Advice to Youthful Student,” in A Compendium of English Literature, ed.                    Charles D. Cleveland (Philadelphia: E.C.& J.Biddle, 1851), 642.

“Remember thy Creator in the days of thy youth,” is big with the deepest wisdom: The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom: and an upright heart, that is understanding.  There is eternally true, whether the wits and rakes of Cambridge allow it or not…

                – William Pitt, “General Advice to Youthful Student,” in A Compendium of English Literature, ed.                    Charles D. Cleveland (Philadelphia: E.C.& J.Biddle, 1851), 643.

Cherish true religion.  Remember the essence of religion is, a heart void of offense towards God and man…

                – William Pitt, “General Advice to Youthful Student,” in A Compendium of English Literature, ed.                    Charles D. Cleveland (Philadelphia: E.C.& J.Biddle, 1851), 643.

William Pitt, Earl of Charham, was born this date, 11/15/1708, Westminster, England.  He is said to have placated no magnates and to have refused all bribes yet under his influence England became the most powerful country on the globe.  The source mentioned above states about Pitt “He never hesitated to rebuke, in severest terms, his own country, when he saw she was in the way of wrong doing.”

The quotes above are from a letter to his nephew penned at Bath, January 14, 1754.  Pitt died May 11, 1778, at Hayes, Kent.

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