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Posts Tagged ‘grand old Book’

The stars slowly dim,

In their domed night,

As faintest light

Merges from the east.

A sycamore is silhouetted

Against the sky,

And nocturnal animals

Return from their feast.

Another day is beginning

In the place,

Just another day,

Another set of hour’s – rat race.

 

Commerce begins –

Enter a camel train.

A peddler hawks

His trinkets and wares.

The vegetable-stand owner

Begins across the street,

 

And a Baby cries,

Another day, that’s all.

But wait, a Baby cries – 

Not a Baby in the stall?

Buyers bought and

Sellers sold, again.

 

Soldiers marched and

Housewives cleaned their rooms.

But the Baby that cried

Was the Son of God in flesh,

The One Who would cause

The dead to come from their cold tombs.

Bethlehem had not seen

Just another day.

Last night the King was born

And He’s well on His way!

  

Another night will wane

Before long,

The spring of that day

Will seem so same.

Computers will whirl

In skyscrapers around the world.

Wall Street may be brisk

Or maybe another day lame.

It will seem the same.

With telephones ringing,

Airways full of ships of sky,

The radio singing.

 

But a trump

Will sound as no other.

Christ will come before

That day has closed.

The grand Old Book proclaims

“In a day when ye think not.”

The day will look the same as it started out;

Watch that pose,

And for the Christ-like ones

It will have no close,

Heaven has begun. 

He has returned just as He said. –eab, 6/89

 

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It’s easy to be modern,

When you live in a modern day,

To let the old slip from you

To let it slide far away.

 

All that’s progress is not progress.

All was not bad in yesterday.

How we need a fresh revival

Oh, how we need again to pray.

 

The grand old Book has been replaced,

By religious movies and plays.

Great revivals were not products

Of seminars nor picnic days.

 

Praying has a way of making,

A small canoe into a barge.

And also shrinking those big things,

Till they don’t look nearly as large.  – eab, 2/13/07

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