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Posts Tagged ‘history’

No Book names more Geographical locations,

covers a longer period of History,

addresses Science more accurately,

has a broader range of Literary genre,

includes more Genealogical lists,

has a greater store of Advice for life – and – yet

delightfully Points the way to heaven.

Read It.

– eab, 10/13/14

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Today, Friday, July 22 marks the date James I, King of England announced (1604) that he had appointed fifty-four(54) men to translate the Bible into English.  (Imagine a US president, Democrat or Republican, authorizing and then appointing anyone to preserve God’s Words today.)  Some in attacking the genuineness of this Classic Text attack King James. History, no doubt, proves his humanness and perhaps worse, but sins (few or many) should not detract from his commissioning this proper project.

 

English, which seems old to us (& US) was a relatively new language. The widespread reading of God’s Holy Book helped to solidify a still somewhat plastic tongue. The Authorized Version (a.k.a. KJV) deserves a great deal of credit for the standardization of our native tongue.  The ships were soon sailing Englishmen to live permanently in the “new world” and among their few and precious possessions were copies of this great Text. Yes, English businessmen and soldiers helped spread our language.  But perhaps of equal or greater value were the travels of men, preaching in English, upon all the inhabited continents.  And from what were they preaching?  They read, memorized, and spoke from the incomparable, beautiful Authorized Bible. 

 

God, who has never muffed an opportunity, never missed an appointment, nor ever been a minute late, allowed the King of England to help the cause of Christ on July 22, 1604 by appointing men of scholastic ability and spiritual interest to give England, yea, the world, such a grand Book.

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In August of nineteen seventy-two,

A new school started for you, and you.

In northern Ohio (fairest of states),

With textbooks, paper, and pencils, brand new,

(Erasers soon showed a trillion mistakes.)

 

That building remade with paint and a brush,

At eight-thirty (What?) stilled to a meek hush.

Green, young students (the intelligent sort),

Closed the gap from May with such a mad rush,

They couldn’t receive an interim report.

 

Grammar, and algebra, history, and shop,

Quizzes and tests, there was no place to stop;

Bible and other classes taught the rule,

To study, to read, to not be a flop,

Attending Wyandot Christian School.

 

Then came the fall outing (Remember that?)

A basketball game, the slim ‘gainst the fat.

Hot dogs were served (Yours were cold did you say?)

Three deep made some run; while others fell flat.

Cider, coco, and donuts (?) closed the day.

 

Tonight we are met in this banquet hall,

Behind lies the past, behind the quick fall,

Ahead lies the birthday of our Great Lord;

Vacation time, snow time, gift time, and all,

May you be blest with all heaven’s accord.

 

May you be – Oh, I forget to mention,

Miss Knaul, in the hall and noon‘s detention,

A trio girl who visits the jury,

Jogging, Perkins, a raccoon’s dissection.

Good-bye.  We’ll see you in seventy three.  – eab, 12/72

Penned while Principal of Wyandot and living at 205 Goodbread Street in Nevada, OH.

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Whether his name was Zacchaes or Zacharias is unknown but in the hotel industry he became known as *Zack.

 

It is not known if he inherited Bethlehem‘s “Best Eastern” from his family,

his wife’s family, or bought it out­right. 

 

But on THAT famous night he was the proprietor of the inn.

 

Zack may have been young or old, the record does not say. We are not informed if he was wealthy or poor – barely meeting his pay­ments on the inn.

 

Was Zack tall or short, skinny or fat? 

No docu­ments exist to acclaim his great learning or lack thereof.

 

Was Zack a gentleman with a handsome profile or did his face reveal low breeding? Were his words kind and friendly or were they harsh? 

 

We’re not told if he was attired in the latest Roman robe or if his appearance was con­servatively Hebrew.  Was he mar­ried?  Had HIS wife ever given birth to a child?  Had HE ever traveled from Bethlehem and needed a room?

 

What was he worth the night he died?  What were his perks?  How much did he earn each week?  Where was he born?  What was his genealogy? 

 

How long did he own the “famous” inn?  Did Zack enjoy plain mutton chops and bread or was he a connoisseur of Mediterranean dining?

 

Did he race camels, collect Hittite pottery or trivialize his time with some other hobby?

Were his days simple or scheduled seg­ments of managerial perfection? 

 

Zack’s hair, was it black, styl­ishly cut or was it a mere shadow of its former glory with an ex­ceedingly wide part?

 

We do not know his race, face, pace, or even his grace.  Was he a faithful worshipper at the local synagogue or had he imbibed “modern thoughts” about God? 

 

Did he ever learn who his AL­MOST Guest was?

 

For a key player in history we know so little about him.

 

HISTORY HAS LEFT BUT ONE FACT, ABOUT ZACK

                 – HE HAD NO ROOM FOR JESUS!

 

Written while pastoring Bible Holiness Chapel, Oelrichs, SD and printed in the Hot Springs Star (newspaper) Dec., 1995

 

* No, we have not discovered some old scroll detailing the inns of the Holy Land, but allow me to use Zack in stead of saying “the innkeeper” each time and it could even make this story more real.

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The Christ of prophecy

      became the Jesus of history and

            will become the Lord of glory.   – eab, 9/88  

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What God begets is God…What God creates is not God.

            – C. S. Lewis, Beyond Personality (NY: Macmillan, 1945), 5.

 

…God has no history.  He is too completely and utterly real to have one.        

            – C. S. Lewis, Beyond Personality (NY: Macmillan, 1945), 17.

 

When He said, “Be perfect,” He meant it…It may be hard for an egg to turn into a bird: it would be a jolly sight harder for it to learn to fly while remaining an egg.  We are like eggs at present.  And you cannot go in indefinitely being just an ordinary, decent egg.  We must be hatched or go bad.

             – C. S. Lewis, Beyond Personality (NY: Macmillan, 1945), 42.

 

It cost God nothing, as far as we know, to create nice things: but to convert rebellious wills cost Him the crucifixion.

            – C. S. Lewis, Beyond Personality (NY: Macmillan, 1945), 55.

 

Clive Staples Lewis died this date. He had taught at Oxford (1924-1954) and Cambridge (1954-1963) universities. In his early thirties, Lewis was converted to Jesus Christ. He is best known for his children’s classic The Chronicles of Narnia (1950-1956), and for Screwtape Letters, Miracles,and Mere Christianity.  Lewis was born 11/29/1898, Belfast, Ireland.

 

 

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