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Posts Tagged ‘J D Webb Sr.’

J D WEBB SR. (He’s in the top 20 people who influenced my life.)

It’s one thing to set biographical note,

Recounting birth and marriage, and death,

Merely stating the facts as they go,

From first to the latest breath.

It’s another entirely to contemplate,

Selectively choose, accurately state,

The feelings, the memories,

The anchoring points, old man-to-young

Reflecting, grateful for impressions

Left, largely unsung.

He was old when we met, then I was ten,

(When anyone out of high school was old).

I was a Sunday School lad;

He was the Shepherd of the fold.

I could hear his bass from the platform ring

When he joined the congregation to sing.

And remember the morning

Obadiah was his Holy text,

Not expecting my nephew

Then two, to loudly say it next.

John Denver Webb was born when

Benjamin Harrison sat in the oval room.

He and Ike were a part

Of the eighteen-ninety “baby boom.”

While, Eisenhower’s “fifty-two” November,

Was the first campaign I remember.

Bro. Webb became, as I grew older,

(What “kid” likes old stuff?)

My cementing-link with history:

Great, and graceful, and gruff.

Why, he remembered boys going to war –

Teddy Roosevelt’s rough-riding boys!

His nineteen fourteen Cadillac, when two years old

Brought him great joys.

The open bi-plane introduced him to the sky,

He even saw Orville Wright fly,

And he ran the telegraph,

Once the life-line of the trains,

Before God saved and called him

Under old-time conviction pains.

His life covered that great early span of

Shelhamer and Rees, Culp, Fleming, and Ruth

He knew Charles Stalker; the man God saved,

And brightened his mind to truth.

And he shared a breakfast “spud,”

With that famous, Nazarene cowboy, Uncle Bud.

He slipped away on an October morn,

Away to heaven’s portal.

He changed old fleshly clothes, outworn,

Changed them for the immortal.     

– eab, Oct. ‘86

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Glimpses of  Greatness

Was he married?

 Who was he, really?

 Who were his contemporaries?

 What was he like out of the pulpit?

 What about his prayer life?

 Where was he born?

 Where did his travels take him?

 When did she teach?

 When did he write that?

 Why did she have that impact?

 Why was he so successful?

 What about his sense of humor?

 Glimpses of Greatness can answer some of the above and can tell you a bit more.  It is Edgar Bryan’s attempt to share personal insights in the lives of fifty-four (54) people he has personally heard and/or knew.

1.   Earl Adams

2.   Leroy (Mrs) Adams

3.   J. Wesley Adock

4.   V. O.  Agan

5.   E. B. Annabel

6.   Duncan Campbell

7.   Ray Chamberlain

8.   John W. Colwell

9.   T. W. Comadoll

10. Millard Downing

11. Wilfred Edwards

12. H. L. Ferguson

13. Paul W. Finch

14. R. G. Flexon

15. Dempsy W. Fossit

16. C. Ponder Frederick

17. Geraldine French

18. H. Robb French      

19. Glenn Griffith

20. Vance Havner

21. George Hawthorne

22. Steve D. Herron

23. Jack Holcom

24. Andrew Johnson

25. John F. Kennedy

26. Bert King

27. O. L. King

28. Jerry H. Lawson

29. August Luelf

30. E. G.  Marsh

31. I. Parker Maxey

32. Thurman McCoy

33. Warren C. McIntire

34. Henry Morris

35. Nettie Peabody

36. Leonard Ravenhill

37. Remus Rehfeldt

38. Rufus Reisdorph

39. Marguerite Reiss

40. Harry Shreve

41. Oswald J. Smith

42. William Steen         

43. Harry Straight

44. J. D. Sumner

45. J. Percy Trueblood

46. George B. Vernon, Jr

47. J. D. Webb, Sr.

48. Mom White

49. C. B. Widmeyer

50. Leslie D. Wilcox

51. Howard Williams

52. Jimmy Willis

53. Richard Wurmbrandt

54. Alvin (Mrs) York

 Find out how to get YOUR copy of Glimpses of Greatness.  PLACE “Glimpses of Greatness” on the subject line when you email. eabryan1@aol.com

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Sometime last month you had a birthday;

The exact date, I’m sorry, I forgot.

You turned eighty-five, 85, I say.

Eighty-five years Brother, is a lot.

 

Four score and five is almost enough

To be antique. (Don’t be offended,

Antiques, you know, I love in the rough,

So stick with me till I’m ended.)

 

You’ve lived to see the horse-less carriage,

Turn from touring car to streamline.

And conversely the steam, steel-horse rage,

Once strong, you’ve seen fully decline.

 

The airplane you saw at its outset,[1]

Not dreaming that soon, oh so soon,

The bi-plane would give way to the jet,

And you’d live to see men on the moon.

 

As I’d mention a “great,” you’d known him:

Rees,[2] Fleming,[3] Culp,[4] Uncle Bud,[5] and Ruth,[6]

Anderson,[7] Stalker,[8] and Wireman.[9]

You’ve been privileged to hear preach the truth.

 

You have lived and known such a spectrum,

Of the past, and ones who have gone on.

You’re the one for me, who connects them,

A living, Godly historian.[10]

 

So I’m glad to have had you Brother,

As pastor, advisor, and friend.

With wishes for many another,

These (late) birthday greetings I send. – eab, 2/75


[1] He saw one of the Wright Brothers fly.

[2] J D Webb Sr. was ordained by Seth C Rees, ate with Uncle Buddy, told about Stalker’s previous affliction, and had Wireman as evangelist when Webb pastored the Pilgrim Holiness church in Bremen, Ohio.

[3] John and Bona Fleming were brothers.

[4] George B Culp

[5] At Webb’s sister’s house he ate breakfast with Uncle Buddy (Rueben Robinson)

[6] C W (Christian Wismer) Ruth

[7] T M (Tony) Anderson

[8] Charlie Stalker

[9] I had privilege of hearing “Bulldog” Charlie Wireman.

[10] His first car was a 1914 Cadillac which he owned in 1916.

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