Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘New Testament’

You cannot indulge

 

 

 in OT “morality”

 

 

and enjoy a NT experience.  

– eab, 9/4/11

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Martin Luther, on his way away from Wurms, was “kidnapped” (by friends) and wisked to Wartburg Castle.  Here he, “Sir George,” a knight (the nicest knight the castle ever knew), translated the New Testament into the German language, making brief visits to neighboring villages to listen to “everyday German” being spoken.  He translated from Erasmus‘ Greek New Testament (2nd edition), the Textus Receptus, avoiding the Vulgate “official translation” of Roman Catholics.

 

This feat was to prove a defeat for Romish heiarchy.  Now folks had the NT in the venacular.  It was now a Book of the people.  Schaff says it “was so much multiplied and spread by printers that even tailors and shoemakers, yea, even women and ignorant persons who had accepted this new Lutheran gospel, and could read a little German, studied it with the greatest avidity as the fountain of all truth.” – Philip Schaff, History of the Christian Church (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1910), 6

 

It appears that though Luther’s Bible wasn’t the first translation into German, it had the greatest influence – influence in church, home, school and yea, in helping create a national spirit for Germany.   

 

Martin Luther on this date, 9/21/1522,  first published his German translation, six months after his return to Wittenberg.  Luther was extrmemly important in what is commonly called the Reformation, his hymn “A Mighty Fortress” has earned him a high rank among the best hymn writers, but his New Testament (and translation of the entire Bible, 1534) is probably his greatest literary achievement.

Read Full Post »

Desiderius Erasmus was born this date 10/26/1466.  He was Dutch scholar and editor who was the first “best-selling” author.  Of course, he had the advantage of writing after the invention of the movable-type for the printing press.  He produced a Greek New Testament which had a degree of influence on Tyndale (England) and Zwingli (Switzerland). 

He might be called a pseudo reformer, seeing some of what Luther saw but (so unlike Luther) being unwilling to leave the Roman Catholic system, seeking rather to reform through scholarship. He also penned a satire, Praise of Folly which was more popular, in his life, than his Greek New Testament. You may also see his birthday as the 27th or 28th.)

Read Full Post »

…Faith…is the only door through which God comes into the human soul.

   Daniel Steele  The Gospel of the Comforter  (unknown printer/date; reprint, Rochester, NY: Schmul, 1960), 29.

 

…The exception proves the rule.                      

   Daniel Steele  The Gospel of the Comforter  (unknown printer/date; reprint, Rochester, NY: Schmul, 1960), 38.

 

David Livingston “‘I expressed that my object was to elevate him and his people to be Christians.’  He replied, ‘I do not wish to learn to read the Book, for I am afraid it might change my heart and make me content with one wife, like Sechele (a converted chief).  No, no, I want always to have five wives at least.’”

   Daniel Steele  The Gospel of the Comforter  (unknown printer/date; reprint, Rochester, NY: Schmul, 1960), 43.

 

…Character originates from free choice…

   Daniel Steele  The Gospel of the Comforter  (unknown printer/date; reprint, Rochester, NY: Schmul, 1960), 44.

 

The Spirit never coerces a free agent.

   Daniel Steele  The Gospel of the Comforter  (unknown printer/date; reprint, Rochester, NY: Schmul, 1960), 54.

 

…In the New Testament we never read expressly and unmistakably of sanctification as a gradual process.

   Daniel Steele  The Gospel of the Comforter  (unknown printer/date; reprint, Rochester, NY: Schmul, 1960), 100.

 

Daniel Steele was born this date, 10/5/1824, at Windham, NY.  He wrote the above and  Love Enthroned.

Read Full Post »

I gave My life for thee, My precious blood I shed,
That thou might ransomed be, and raised up from the dead
I gave, I gave My life for thee, what hast thou given for Me?
I gave, I gave My life for thee, what hast thou given for Me?

My Father’s house of light, My glory circled throne
I left for earthly night, for wanderings sad and lone;
I left, I left it all for thee, hast thou left aught for Me?
I left, I left it all for thee, hast thou left aught for Me?

I suffered much for thee, more than thy tongue can tell,
Of bitterest agony, to rescue thee from hell.
I’ve borne, I’ve borne it all for thee, what hast thou borne for Me?
I’ve borne, I’ve borne it all for thee, what hast thou borne for Me?

And I have brought to thee, down from My home above,
Salvation full and free, My pardon and My love;
I bring, I bring rich gifts to thee, what hast thou brought to Me?
I bring, I bring rich gifts to thee, what hast thou brought to Me?

Frances Ridley Havergal died 6/3/1879 at Caswall Bay, near Swansea, Wales (had been born in England). The daughter of hymnist William Havergal, she is said to have been reading by age four and writing verse at seven. She learned Latin, Greek and Hebrew, and memorized the Psalms, the book of Isaiah, and most of the New Testament.

 “I Gave My Life Thee” was Havergal’s first hymn (cyberhymnal lists eighty hymns).

Read Full Post »

Moderns have tried to excuse the “sword,”

Saying with faces (apparently) straight,

That the great Book, the Book of the Lord

Allows killing as a “Christian” trait.

 

Such souls partly (willingly?) blinded,

Speak of David and others of fame;

Seem not to see the battles sited,

Do not a modern violence so claim.

 

True it is, without any trace of a doubt, 

Many men in the Israelite camp,

Fought with, conquered, “took Canaanites out,”    

Leaving many spots blood-red and damp.

 

Name a New Testament group or man –

With (after grace) one notch in his “gun.”

Show once where Jesus’ life-loving plan,

Wants pagans killed under moon or sun.

 

Some men divide “murder” from “killing,”

(They speak not of accident’s result)

For their “national interest,” they’re willing

To kill heathen in army assault.

 

Does the sinner on the other side, 

Lying in blood, slipping into hell,

Know you didn’t “murder” as he died,

Was gun or bomb “Christian” – could he tell?

 

We…WAR not after the flesh” [1] Paul wrote.

Our weapons are not carnal he said.

Christ has no part in “national gloat,”

He sorrows – as both sides count their dead.

 

Nations “using” Scripture to back gore,

Must reach pre-cross to “prove” their bad point,

God winkled at brutality of yore,

Jesus does not carnal war anoint.

 

One sword was swung by disciple hand,

It missed – severed Malchus from his ear.

Did Christ thank Peter for “righteous” stand?

No.  He healed – His enemy could hear.

 

Jesus missed a opportunity,

If He had wanted followers to kill

He didn’t.  Followers need to see

Killing (war) is not the Master’s will.   – eab, 11/26/2006


[1] 2Co 10.3

Read Full Post »

The Cross is the dividing point between the

          OLD Testament and the NEW Testament.

 

The Cross is the dividing point between the

          OLD life (sinner) and the NEW life (saint).                                                                          – eab, 10/08

Read Full Post »