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Posts Tagged ‘Piedmont’

…Vigilantius…denied that the tombs and the bones of the martyrs were to be honored…maintained that prayers addressed to departed saints were void of all efficacy; and treated with contempt fasting and mortifications, the celibacy of clergy…

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 49.

 

…imperfect mortals…are much more disposed to worship with the eye than with the heart…

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 53.

 

The doctrine of Augustine, who was of opinion that, in the work of conversion and sanctification, all was to be attributed to a divine energy, and nothing to human agency, had many followers in all ages of the church; though his disciples have never been entirely agreed about the manner of explaining what he taught upon that head.

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 89.

 

The terror of Mahomet’s arms…persuaded such multitudes to embrace his religion…his law was artfully and marvelously adapted to the corrupt nature of man.

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 157.

 

It is highly probable that the Valdenses, or Vaudois [Waldenses] had already, in this century [Cent. VII] retired into the vallies [sic] of Piedmont, that they might be more at liberty to oppose the tyranny of those imperious prelates.

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 167.

 

The clergy…were distinguished by their luxury, their gluttony, and their lust; they gave themselves up to dissipation of various kinds, to the pleasures of hunting and what was still more remote from their sacred character, to military studies and enterprises.

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 214.

 

This horrid opinion [that excommunication included loosing the “claims and privileges of humanity”] which was a fatal source of wars, massacres, and rebellions…was borrowed by…the clergy, from the pagan superstitions.

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 221.

 

Johann (John) Lorenz von Mosheim was born this date, 10/9/1693 (or 1694), at Lubeck, Germany.  He was a highly esteemed Lutheran, Church historian. In 1747 he was made chancellor of the University of Göttingen.  He wrote An Ecclesiastical History.  Johann Mosheim died 9/9/1755.

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“On the Late Late Massacre in Piedmont”

 

Avenge, O Lord, thy slaughtered saints, whose bones

Lie scattered on the Alpine mountains cold;

Ev’n them who kept the truth so pure of old,

When all our fathers worshipped stocks and stones,

Forget not: in thy book record their groans

Who were thy sheep, and in their ancient fold

Slain by the bloody Piedmontese, that rolled

Mother with infant down the rocks.  Their moans

The vales redoubled to the hills, and they

To heav’n.  Their martyred blood and ashes sow

O’er all th’ Italian fields, where still doth sway

The triple Tyrant that from these may grow

A hundredfold, who, having learnt thy way,

Early may fly the Babylonian woe.

 

John Milton, one of the greatest (if not the greatest) poet of England died 11/6/1674 in London.  He is best known for Paradise Lost (1667), Paradise Regained (1671) but this is a good sonnet of his.  Milton was a philosopher, hynmist, poet, and theologian. 

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