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Posts Tagged ‘Queen Mary’

“Imprisonment is painful, but liberty, on ill conditions, is worse. The prison stinks, yet not so much as the sweet houses where the fear of God is wanting. I must be alone and solitary; it is better so to be, and have God with me, than to be in bad company. The loss of goods is great, but the loss of grace and the favor of God is greater. I cannot tell how to answer before great men, and learned men; yet is it better to do that, than to stand naked before God’s tribunal. I shall die by the hands of cruel men; but he is blessed who loseth his life, and findeth life eternal. There is neither felicity nor adversity in the world that is great, if it be weighed with the joys and pains of the world to come.”

                                                – Reported to be from a letter Hooper penned in prison.

John Hooper was martyred this date, 2/9/1555.  Some time after receiving his Bachelor of Arts from Cambridge he was converted to Christ by the writings of the German reformers.  At one point he felt obliged to flee to France and was briefly associate Huguenots. Later he was associated with Bullinger (Zwingli’s successor).  He returned to England and under Edward VI, was made Bishop of Gloucester.

In the providence of God Edward died.  He was followed by Queen Mary and she as a Roman Catholic required Hooper’s death.  Thus the “Father of the Puritans” was burned at the stake in the 60th year of his life. He was born c. 1495, at Somersetshire, England.

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For those who may not know Knox, he was a powerful Presbyterian Minister who opposed Queen Mary and the system she represented.  With that opposition in mind the following prayer is an insight into his soul.

“Illuminate the heart of our Sovereign Lady Queen Mary with pregnant gifts of the Holy Ghost, and influence the hearts of her council with Thy true fear and love.”  – Wm M Taylor, John Knox, (NY: A C Armstrong & Sons, 1885), 67.

In direct conversation with this same Queen, in response to her question he said, “Yea, madame, to me it appertains no less to forewarn of such things as may hurt it [the commonwealth], if I foresee them, then it doth to any of the nobility; for both my vocation and conscience requires plainness of me.” – Wm M Taylor, John Knox, (NY: A C Armstrong & Sons, 1885), 171.

Some knew the possible danger he was in to which he replied, “As for the fear of danger that may come to me let no man be solicitious, for my life is in the custody of Him whose glory I seek, and therefore I cannot so fear their boast or tyranny that I cease from doing my duty, when of His mercy He offereth me the occasion.” – Wm M Taylor, John Knox, (NY: A C Armstrong & Sons, 1885), 124.

On another occastion when some questioned his speaking as he did; he replied, “I am in the place where I am demanded of my consiecne to speak the truth; and therefore the truth I will speak; impugn it who so list.”  – Wm M Taylor, John Knox, (NY: A C Armstrong & Sons, 1885), 176.

After hearing of the St. Bartholomew Day massacre he had an opportunity to address Le Croc, the French ambassador, “Go tell your master that sentence is pronounced against him; that the Divine vengeance shall never depart from him or from his house, except they repent…”    – Wm M Taylor, John Knox, (NY: A C Armstrong & Sons, 1885), 196.

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