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Posts Tagged ‘Philadelphia’

There is sunshine in my soul today,
More glorious and bright
Than glows in any earthly sky,
For Jesus is my Light.

Refrain

O there’s sunshine, blessèd sunshine,
When the peaceful, happy moments roll;
When Jesus shows His smiling face,
There is sunshine in the soul.

There is music in my soul today,
A carol to my King,
And Jesus, listening, can hear
The songs I cannot sing.

There is springtime in my soul today,
For, when the Lord is near,
The dove of peace sings in my heart,
The flowers of grace appear.

There is gladness in my soul today,
And hope and praise and love,
For blessings which He gives me now,
For joys “laid up” above.

Eliza Edmunds Hewitt died this date, 4/24/1920, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  This cousin of writer Edgar Page Stites, authored some 50 songs including “Stepping in the Light,” “Give Me Thy Heart,” “When We All Get to Heaven,” “More About Jesus,” “My Faith Has Found a Resting Place,” “Singing I Go,” “Under the Blood.”

Eliza graduated valedictorian and became teacher and a Sunday School teacher.  This life of teaching was shortened by a spine problem.  She had only a partial recovery.  She was became a regular contributor to Sunday-school Helps.  She was born6/28/1851,Philadelphia,Pennsylvania.

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Sing the wondrous love of Jesus,
Sing His mercy and His grace.
In the mansions bright and blessèd
He’ll prepare for us a place.

Refrain

When we all get to Heaven,
What a day of rejoicing that will be!
When we all see Jesus,
We’ll sing and shout the victory!

While we walk the pilgrim pathway,
Clouds will overspread the sky;
But when traveling days are over,
Not a shadow, not a sigh.

Let us then be true and faithful,
Trusting, serving every day;
Just one glimpse of Him in glory
Will the toils of life repay.

Onward to the prize before us!
Soon His beauty we’ll behold;
Soon the pearly gates will open;
We shall tread the streets of gold.

Eliza Edmunds Hewitt died this date, 4/24/1920, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  She was a Presbyterian Sunday School teacher who authored at least fifty songs among which are: “There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today,” “Stepping in the Light,” “Give Me Thy Heart,” “More About Jesus,” “My Faith Has Found a Resting Place,” “Singing I Go,” “Under the Blood.”  She was also a regular contributor to Sunday-school Helps.

After graduation from school (valedictorian) Eliza began teaching. However, her career was cut short by a serious spinal problem. She partially recovered, but was an invalid most of her life. She then turned to hymn writing, which ran in the family. Her cousin was hymnist Edgar Page Stites.

Eliza was born 6/28/1851, in Philadelphia and lived all her life in there.

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The lump of clay, from the moment it comes under the transforming hand of the potter, is, during each day and each hour of the process, just what the potter wants it to be at that hour or on that day, and therefore pleases him. But it is very far from being matured into the vessel he intends in the future to make it.

            – Hannah Whitall Smith, The Christian’s Secret of a Happy Life (Westwood, NJ:                                Fleming Revell Co., 1952), 33.

Hannah Whitall Smith was born this date, 2/7/1832, at Philadelphia, PA.  She was a daughter of well-to-do Quaker parents.  After she married Robert Piersall Smith they converted to the group called Plymouth Brethren.  They were said to have a “new experience” (1867) and began a speaking tour of the United States and Europe. Their “Higher Christian Life” meetings in England were popular.  In 1875 she published, The Christian’s Secret of a Happy Life a book which has been printed in several languages.

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If obliged to differ…do I with all possible candor, and an unprejudiced desire to find and ascertain truth, with an entire indifference to the side on which truth is found.

                – William Pitt, “General Advice to Youthful Student,” in A Compendium of English Literature, ed.                    Charles D. Cleveland (Philadelphia: E.C.& J.Biddle, 1851), 642.

If you are not right towards God, you can never be so towards man.

                – William Pitt, “General Advice to Youthful Student,” in A Compendium of English Literature, ed.                    Charles D. Cleveland (Philadelphia: E.C.& J.Biddle, 1851), 642.

“Remember thy Creator in the days of thy youth,” is big with the deepest wisdom: The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom: and an upright heart, that is understanding.  There is eternally true, whether the wits and rakes of Cambridge allow it or not…

                – William Pitt, “General Advice to Youthful Student,” in A Compendium of English Literature, ed.                    Charles D. Cleveland (Philadelphia: E.C.& J.Biddle, 1851), 643.

Cherish true religion.  Remember the essence of religion is, a heart void of offense towards God and man…

                – William Pitt, “General Advice to Youthful Student,” in A Compendium of English Literature, ed.                    Charles D. Cleveland (Philadelphia: E.C.& J.Biddle, 1851), 643.

William Pitt, Earl of Charham, was born this date, 11/15/1708, Westminster, England.  He is said to have placated no magnates and to have refused all bribes yet under his influence England became the most powerful country on the globe.  The source mentioned above states about Pitt “He never hesitated to rebuke, in severest terms, his own country, when he saw she was in the way of wrong doing.”

The quotes above are from a letter to his nephew penned at Bath, January 14, 1754.  Pitt died May 11, 1778, at Hayes, Kent.

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…He that covets can no more be a moral man than he that steals; since he does so in this mind.  Nor can he be one that robs his neighbor of his credit, or that craftily undermines him of his trade, or office.

                – William Penn, Fruits of Solitude in Reflections and Maxims (Philadelphia: Benjamin Johnson, 1792), 107. 

 William Penn on this date, 10/27/1682, arrived in America.  He was an English Quaker, a colonist, and the founder of Pennsylvania (which he named after his father).  He wrote “No Cross, no Crown; a Discourse showing the Nature & Discipline of the Holy Cross of Christ” (1688).

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…Vigilantius…denied that the tombs and the bones of the martyrs were to be honored…maintained that prayers addressed to departed saints were void of all efficacy; and treated with contempt fasting and mortifications, the celibacy of clergy…

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 49.

 

…imperfect mortals…are much more disposed to worship with the eye than with the heart…

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 53.

 

The doctrine of Augustine, who was of opinion that, in the work of conversion and sanctification, all was to be attributed to a divine energy, and nothing to human agency, had many followers in all ages of the church; though his disciples have never been entirely agreed about the manner of explaining what he taught upon that head.

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 89.

 

The terror of Mahomet’s arms…persuaded such multitudes to embrace his religion…his law was artfully and marvelously adapted to the corrupt nature of man.

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 157.

 

It is highly probable that the Valdenses, or Vaudois [Waldenses] had already, in this century [Cent. VII] retired into the vallies [sic] of Piedmont, that they might be more at liberty to oppose the tyranny of those imperious prelates.

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 167.

 

The clergy…were distinguished by their luxury, their gluttony, and their lust; they gave themselves up to dissipation of various kinds, to the pleasures of hunting and what was still more remote from their sacred character, to military studies and enterprises.

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 214.

 

This horrid opinion [that excommunication included loosing the “claims and privileges of humanity”] which was a fatal source of wars, massacres, and rebellions…was borrowed by…the clergy, from the pagan superstitions.

                – Mosheim, John Lawrence, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (Philadelphia: Stephen Ustick, 1798), 221.

 

Johann (John) Lorenz von Mosheim was born this date, 10/9/1693 (or 1694), at Lubeck, Germany.  He was a highly esteemed Lutheran, Church historian. In 1747 he was made chancellor of the University of Göttingen.  He wrote An Ecclesiastical History.  Johann Mosheim died 9/9/1755.

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The truest end of life is to know that life never ends.

                – William Penn, Reflections and Maxims (Philadelphia: Benjamin Johnson, 1792), 94.

 

If I am even with my enemy, the debt is paid; but if I forgive it I oblige him forever. 

                – William Penn, Reflections and Maxims (Philadelphia: Benjamin Johnson, 1792), 103.

 

Truth has never lost ground by inquiry.

                – William Penn, Reflections and Maxims (Philadelphia: Benjamin Johnson, 1792), 137.

 

William Penn on this date, 9/3/1667, was imprisoned for faith 1667.  His principal and perhaps most popular theological work was No Cross, no Crown; a Discourse showing the Nature & Discipline of the Holy Cross of Christ

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