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Posts Tagged ‘Martin Luther’

“…the devil’s cunning…if he cannot hurt by persecuting and destroying,

he doth it under color of correcting and building up.

– Martin Luther, from his Commentary on Galatians

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ON THIS DATE

Martin Luther was born 11/10/1483 in Eisleben, Germany, to Hans (a coal miner) and Margaret Luther.  He entered the Roman Catholic Augustinian order, later was sent to teach at the University of Wittenberg.  This teaching allowed him to study Scripture – he discovered that God justifies through faith.  His hammer blows (1517) of the 95 theses were heard “around the world.”  Roman Catholics excommunicated him but no matter, Luther became one of the greatest Christians of his day: translating the Bible into German, penning numerous other writings and several hymns, including the immortal “A Mighty Fortress Is Our God.”

After helping rescue a “sixpack of nuns” (six escaped a nunnery in six empty, pickled-herring barrels) he ended up marrying one, Katrina Von Bora (1525).  She became his helpmeet in the great work and bore him six children.  There were other reformers both before and following Luther but Thank God for this chubby German monk-turned-true Believer.  Happy BD Martin Luther.

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ON THIS DATE

Martin Luther on 9/29/1502 received his B.A. degree from the University of Erfurt.  Son of a German coal miner, he (after being “scared to death” by an electrical storm) promised to and became a monk.  God in His faithfulness – God defines faithfulness – led Luther through years and experiences until he saw the Roman Catholic system was wrong and FAITH in the Bible and Christ were right.  Thank God for Luther.

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Evangelicals voting for Catholic politicians?

 

 

What ignorance of history

 

 

Martin Luther, John Calvin, and

 

 

Abraham Lincoln knew BETTER!  

– eab, 1/20/12

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…the devil’s cunning…if he cannot hurt by persecuting and destroying, he doth it under color of correcting & building up.

Martin Luther, Commentary on Galatians (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans Publishing Co, 1930) 44.

 

No man hath so grievously fallen at any time, but he may rise again.  And on the other side, no man taketh so fast footing, but he man fall. If Peter fell, I may likewise fall.

Martin Luther, Commentary on Galatians (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans Publishing Co, 1930) 94.

 

…No man can sufficiently conceive how horrible the idolatry of the papist is.

Martin Luther, Commentary on Galatians (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans Publishing Co, 1930) 116.

 

…Where the Holy Ghost dwelleth, he will not suffer a man to be idle.

Martin Luther, Commentary on Galatians (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans Publishing Co, 1930) 133.

 

…this is the proper office of an apostle, to set forth the glory and benefit of Christ.

Martin Luther, Commentary on Galatians (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans Publishing Co, 1930) 255.

 

…Where the fear of God is not, there can be no thirsting for grace or life.

Martin Luther, Commentary on Galatians (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans Publishing Co, 1930) 299.

 

9/29 Martin Luther, 1502, received his B.A. degree from the University of Erfurt.

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Martin Luther, on his way away from Wurms, was “kidnapped” (by friends) and wisked to Wartburg Castle.  Here he, “Sir George,” a knight (the nicest knight the castle ever knew), translated the New Testament into the German language, making brief visits to neighboring villages to listen to “everyday German” being spoken.  He translated from Erasmus‘ Greek New Testament (2nd edition), the Textus Receptus, avoiding the Vulgate “official translation” of Roman Catholics.

 

This feat was to prove a defeat for Romish heiarchy.  Now folks had the NT in the venacular.  It was now a Book of the people.  Schaff says it “was so much multiplied and spread by printers that even tailors and shoemakers, yea, even women and ignorant persons who had accepted this new Lutheran gospel, and could read a little German, studied it with the greatest avidity as the fountain of all truth.” – Philip Schaff, History of the Christian Church (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1910), 6

 

It appears that though Luther’s Bible wasn’t the first translation into German, it had the greatest influence – influence in church, home, school and yea, in helping create a national spirit for Germany.   

 

Martin Luther on this date, 9/21/1522,  first published his German translation, six months after his return to Wittenberg.  Luther was extrmemly important in what is commonly called the Reformation, his hymn “A Mighty Fortress” has earned him a high rank among the best hymn writers, but his New Testament (and translation of the entire Bible, 1534) is probably his greatest literary achievement.

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“Faith justifies

not as a work,

nor as a quality,

nor as knowledge,

but as assent of the will and

firm confidence in the mercy of God.”

 

Martin Luther is said to have said the above on this date 6/16/1539.

 

Germanywas never the same after Luther. Europewas never the same after Luther.  Ah, the WORLD was never the same after this chubby former Roman Catholic monk saw Faith as it is.  Thank God this important Reader (of Bible) and consequently important Reformer and important Writer.

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